Application of mathematical models for predicting the trihalomethanes content in drinking water in the city of Kumanova, North Macedonia


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Authors

  • Bujar H. Durmishi University of Tetova
  • Arbana Durmishi University of Tetova
  • Arianit A. Reka University of Tetova
  • Agim Shabani University of Tetova

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.59287/ijanser.715

Keywords:

Thms, Physico-Chemical Parameters, Drinking Water, Mathematical Models for Prediction, Health

Abstract

Trihalomethanes (THMs) are created as a result of the reaction between chlorine used to disinfect drinking water and natural organic matter in water. At high levels, THMs have been associated with cancer. As a consequence, THMs must be constantly monitored. They are mainly determined by the method of gas chromatography, which is a more difficult procedure and at a higher cost. In recent years, however, mathematical models have been used to predict THMs. These models work by measuring some physico-chemical parameters of drinking water, those values ​​of these parameters are replaced in mathematical models and the THMs content in drinking water can be predicted. The main purpose of this paper was to predict the content of THMs in the drinking water of the city of Kumanova. The measured parameters were: temperature, residual chlorine, pH, electrical conductivity, chemical oxygen, total dissolved solids and chlorides. Measurements were made during the spring season 2022 in the four sampling points. Ten mathematical models were used for prediction and of them the average value with standard deviation of THM was 26.9532 ± 10.03 μg/L. From the result we can conclude that content of THM does not pose a risk to the health of the population.

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Author Biographies

Bujar H. Durmishi, University of Tetova

Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Str. Ilindeni n.n., 1200 Tetova, Republic of North Macedonia

Arbana Durmishi, University of Tetova

Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Str. Ilindeni n.n., 1200 Tetova, Republic of North Macedonia

Arianit A. Reka, University of Tetova

Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Str. Ilindeni n.n., 1200 Tetova, Republic of North Macedonia

Agim Shabani, University of Tetova

Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, Str. Ilindeni n.n., 1200 Tetova, Republic of North Macedonia

References

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Published

2023-05-19

How to Cite

Durmishi, B. H., Durmishi, A., Reka, A. A., & Shabani, A. (2023). Application of mathematical models for predicting the trihalomethanes content in drinking water in the city of Kumanova, North Macedonia. International Journal of Advanced Natural Sciences and Engineering Researches, 7(4), 269–278. https://doi.org/10.59287/ijanser.715

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